When disaster strikes

Finnish-born Maarit Lalli nearly didn’t survive making the absurd short film The Lake, which is available on the DVD Funny Films of the North.

A lake where you can find exactly what you need. Maybe a boyfriend or a husband. At least that’s what two Finnish sisters find in Maarit Lalli’s magical and absurd short film The Lake.

 

Lalli is born in 1964 and has made several short films. She is probably better known for her TV-writing. She is the co-writer and one of the mainstays of Finland’s longest running TV series, Kotikatu.

 

The Lake from 2006 is available on the DVD Funny Films of the North, which Rushprint has produced in cooperation with three other Nordic magazines.

 

– Maarit Lalli, what were your intentions with making The Lake?

– My intentions were to make an absurd, weird and funny film that plays with traditional Finnish issues like bright midnight summer, rowing boats, a lake and relationships between two sisters.

 

ABOUT TO RUN AWAY
– What was the greatest challenge about making this film, artistically as well as practically?

– Practically, we had only two nights to shoot and no electric light. The other night was the only rainy night the whole summer and we lost many shooting hours. Totally the film was made in about fifteen or sixteen hours. It was also very difficult to work on water. We had five boats for the film crew and every one of them was going in a different direction from the boat with the actors. On top of that, Elina Knihtilä (who plays the main character Mailis, ed.) had practiced in another boat earlier. The new one was so heavy and almost impossible to steer.

 

– It was also quite dark. I had to trust the actresses to do what I told them, I could hardly see anything. We only had one shot at filming Mailis falling into the lake. Because when you have no electricity, you have no hairdryer. And when you have no hairdryer, you have no dry hair. The only happy circumstance was the fact that the crew was the most professional group you can track down in all of Finland. We had major problems, but someone always thought of a solution.

 

– At six am the second morning, there was a moment, when I really wanted to run away. We had no more time and we hadn’t even filmed the last act. On second thought, it would be the end of my career if I ran away. I was lucky enough that the actresses didn’t run away. We finished shooting six hours later. Immediately, one of the actresses went to the shooting of her next feature film, while the other one felt terribly sick. She was pregnant. We are still friends to this day.

– What reactions do you wish to provoke in the audience with The Lake?

– Laughter, surprise, and the hope that everything is possible if you believe. That there somewhere in Finland is a lake, in which you can find what you need.

– How do you regard the result?

– Because of the practical problems – the lack of money, too little pre-thinking in organizing the film, time, and the rain – I couldn’t get close enough with the actresses. The rhythm of reactions is not as fast as I planned. And we couldn’t get enough shots to cut it better. The film is alright, but not good or funny enough. It isn’t a classic, which I wanted it to be. I keep practicing so I can make one in the future.

– What reactions do you wish to provoke in the audience with The Lake?

– Laughter and surprise. The hope that everything is possible if you only believe it. And that there – somewhere in Finland – is a lake, in which you can find what you are looking for.

 

– What projects are you currently working on?

– I have shot my first feature film, Almost 18. The film is about five seventeen-year-old men in Helsinki. It’s not only about their bad behavior that we experience in the beginning of the film, it’s also about the sensibility and the love they have for their little brothers, dads, moms, and girlfriends. I have written the script with my own 19-old son, and five young amateurs are playing the five boys. It premiers in autumn 2012.


THE RICHEST WOMAN IN EUROPE
– I’m also writing the script for Le Grand Sancy, film I’m also directing. It’s about Aurora Karamzin, who lived in the nineteenth century. She was the richest woman in Europe at the time. She was a woman who had it all, and she was independent, but how did she really use her authority and wealth?

 

– What do you think of the current state of Finnish film and TV?

– There are few newcomers like Zaida Bergroth and Aleksi Salmenperä, whose work I like. Other than that, I haven’t seen many Finnish films in the last years, they are quite un-personal if I may say so.

 

– It is obvious that especially Finnish TV doesn’t believe in absurd films anymore. They don’t take any risks by trying to make bold stories, and they almost don’t have any money to finance Finnish film these days. The Finnish Film Foundation has, but they can’t finance by them self. So the future for making absurd, funny films or TV-series in Finland doesn’t seem bright.

 

By Mads Suldrup and Thomas S. Sejersen / Filmmagasinet Ekko


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When disaster strikes

Finnish-born Maarit Lalli nearly didn’t survive making the absurd short film The Lake, which is available on the DVD Funny Films of the North.

A lake where you can find exactly what you need. Maybe a boyfriend or a husband. At least that’s what two Finnish sisters find in Maarit Lalli’s magical and absurd short film The Lake.

 

Lalli is born in 1964 and has made several short films. She is probably better known for her TV-writing. She is the co-writer and one of the mainstays of Finland’s longest running TV series, Kotikatu.

 

The Lake from 2006 is available on the DVD Funny Films of the North, which Rushprint has produced in cooperation with three other Nordic magazines.

 

– Maarit Lalli, what were your intentions with making The Lake?

– My intentions were to make an absurd, weird and funny film that plays with traditional Finnish issues like bright midnight summer, rowing boats, a lake and relationships between two sisters.

 

ABOUT TO RUN AWAY
– What was the greatest challenge about making this film, artistically as well as practically?

– Practically, we had only two nights to shoot and no electric light. The other night was the only rainy night the whole summer and we lost many shooting hours. Totally the film was made in about fifteen or sixteen hours. It was also very difficult to work on water. We had five boats for the film crew and every one of them was going in a different direction from the boat with the actors. On top of that, Elina Knihtilä (who plays the main character Mailis, ed.) had practiced in another boat earlier. The new one was so heavy and almost impossible to steer.

 

– It was also quite dark. I had to trust the actresses to do what I told them, I could hardly see anything. We only had one shot at filming Mailis falling into the lake. Because when you have no electricity, you have no hairdryer. And when you have no hairdryer, you have no dry hair. The only happy circumstance was the fact that the crew was the most professional group you can track down in all of Finland. We had major problems, but someone always thought of a solution.

 

– At six am the second morning, there was a moment, when I really wanted to run away. We had no more time and we hadn’t even filmed the last act. On second thought, it would be the end of my career if I ran away. I was lucky enough that the actresses didn’t run away. We finished shooting six hours later. Immediately, one of the actresses went to the shooting of her next feature film, while the other one felt terribly sick. She was pregnant. We are still friends to this day.

– What reactions do you wish to provoke in the audience with The Lake?

– Laughter, surprise, and the hope that everything is possible if you believe. That there somewhere in Finland is a lake, in which you can find what you need.

– How do you regard the result?

– Because of the practical problems – the lack of money, too little pre-thinking in organizing the film, time, and the rain – I couldn’t get close enough with the actresses. The rhythm of reactions is not as fast as I planned. And we couldn’t get enough shots to cut it better. The film is alright, but not good or funny enough. It isn’t a classic, which I wanted it to be. I keep practicing so I can make one in the future.

– What reactions do you wish to provoke in the audience with The Lake?

– Laughter and surprise. The hope that everything is possible if you only believe it. And that there – somewhere in Finland – is a lake, in which you can find what you are looking for.

 

– What projects are you currently working on?

– I have shot my first feature film, Almost 18. The film is about five seventeen-year-old men in Helsinki. It’s not only about their bad behavior that we experience in the beginning of the film, it’s also about the sensibility and the love they have for their little brothers, dads, moms, and girlfriends. I have written the script with my own 19-old son, and five young amateurs are playing the five boys. It premiers in autumn 2012.


THE RICHEST WOMAN IN EUROPE
– I’m also writing the script for Le Grand Sancy, film I’m also directing. It’s about Aurora Karamzin, who lived in the nineteenth century. She was the richest woman in Europe at the time. She was a woman who had it all, and she was independent, but how did she really use her authority and wealth?

 

– What do you think of the current state of Finnish film and TV?

– There are few newcomers like Zaida Bergroth and Aleksi Salmenperä, whose work I like. Other than that, I haven’t seen many Finnish films in the last years, they are quite un-personal if I may say so.

 

– It is obvious that especially Finnish TV doesn’t believe in absurd films anymore. They don’t take any risks by trying to make bold stories, and they almost don’t have any money to finance Finnish film these days. The Finnish Film Foundation has, but they can’t finance by them self. So the future for making absurd, funny films or TV-series in Finland doesn’t seem bright.

 

By Mads Suldrup and Thomas S. Sejersen / Filmmagasinet Ekko


Les intervjuer med de andre kortfilmskaperne

Legg igjen en kommentar

Dette nettstedet bruker Akismet for å redusere spam. Lær om hvordan dine kommentar-data prosesseres.

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